UA GIS Courses

Interested in studying GIS at the University of Arizona?

These are the courses for Fall 2021 and Spring 2022 at the University of Arizona that include GIS and geospatial studies.

ANTH 446A/ 546A - Mapping Ancient Cities

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Spring

The course will introduce the student to the history, theory and archaeological evidence for city and landscape planning from the Minoan, Etruscan, Greek and Roman periods.  In addition the course will consider some of the most modern techniques (digital cartography, remote sensing and GIS) in the study of ancient cities and will offer the student the opportunity to learn and practice a number of these modern techniques, including the use of AutoCAD.

 

ANTH  597B - Field School in Egyptian Archaeology

Graduate, 1.00 - 6.00 Units

Main campus: Spring

Archaeological excavation training program that provides an opportunity to engage in all phases of fieldwork. Field techniques include: mapping, remote sensing, trench supervision, and artifact drawing and analysis. Offered on archaeological sites in Egypt or in museums.

EPID  676 - Spatial Epidemiology

Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Spring (odd years only)

This course familiarizes students with spatial analysis emphasizing epidemiologic and public health applications.

GEOG  222 - Working with Numeric, Spatial, and Visual Data: Fundamental Geographic Techniques

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring

This class is designed to furnish students with a basic set of skills in recognizing, locating, processing and analyzing geographic data.  These skills provide a foundation for upper-level classes in statistical methods, Geographic Information Systems, urban and regional development.  These skills also provide a basic professional preparation for employment market requirements including defining research questions, selecting suitable geographic tools and methods to investigate, harvesting and analyzing data, and in presenting findings using computer mapping, spreadsheet, and charting software.

 

GEOG  357 - Geographical Research Methods

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring

Formulation and solution of geographic problems; models, research design, and methods of gathering, analyzing, and portraying geographic data.

 

GEOG  416A/516A  - Computer Cartography

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring

Introduces the principles of map design, production and analysis.

 

GEOG  416C/516C - Urban Geographic Information Systems

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Spring

Introduces concepts and application skills for use of geographic information systems to investigate a range of urban spatial issues and decision-making processes.  Emphasis on complete process of GIS-based problem solving, including project planning, spatial data sources/acquisition, preparation/coding, analysis, representation, and communication.

 

GEOG  416D /516D - PPGIS: Participatory Approaches in Geographic Information Science

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Contact Department

A project-based course focusing on applications and impacts of GIS and other spatial analysis technologies in grassroots community development, participatory decision making, and community-engaged social science.  Class format includes discussion seminar, GIS workshop, collaboration, and out-of-classroom community involvement.

 

GEOG  416F/516F - GIS for the Social Sciences

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall

An advanced course for students who want to integrate social science data and geographic information science into their research or work life.  The course is presented in a lecture/laboratory format.  The lecture portion will deal with conceptual issues necessary for the integration of social science data and approaches within a GIS framework.  The laboratory portion will provide practical experience with GIS software products used for the development and analysis of spatially-referenced social science data sets.

 

GEOG  417/517 - Geographic Information Systems for Natural and Social Sciences

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus, Online: Fall, Spring, Summer

Introduction to the application of GIS and related technologies for both the natural and social sciences. Conceptual issues in GIS database design and development, analysis, and display.

 

GEOG  418 - Analysis of Geospatial Data

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus, Online: Fall

Introduction to spatial analysis and modeling techniques.  Students will learn how to use calculate spatial measurement, apply spatial statistical methods, create surfaces, and develop spatial modeling.  Assignments will allow students to apply the methods to various real world problems.

 

GEOG  419 - Cartographic Modeling for Natural Resources

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Spring

Computer techniques for analyzing, modeling, and displaying geographic information. Development of spatially oriented problem design and the use of logic are applied to the use of GIS programs. Emphasis on applications in land resources management and planning.

 

GEOG  420 /520 - Advanced Geographic Information Systems

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus, Online: Spring

Examines various areas of advanced GIS applications such as dynamic segmentation, surface modeling, spatial statistics, and network modeling. The use of high performance workstations will be emphasized.

 

GEOG  422 - Resource Mapping Using Unmanned Aircraft Systems

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Summer

This course combines aspects of remote sensing, GIS, and biogeography in an interdisciplinary framework to elucidate how land use and land cover can be monitored using UAS. Links will be made with field and satellite-based monitoring techniques to cross-validate landscape maps. Students that take this course will develop a solid scientific and applied basis to address geospatial landscape monitoring questions. They will do this by safely flying a drone, acquiring data in the field and with the drone, processing GPS and multi-sensor data, analyzing these data and creating landscape maps and products.

 

GEOG  424/524 - Integrated Geographic Information Systems

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Spring

Addresses the theoretical rationale, current knowledge and methods for achieving a common spatial basis between remote sensing (image) and GIS (non-image) data.

 

GEOG  457/557 - Statistical Techniques in Geography, Regional Development and Planning

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall

Methods of gathering and analyzing data for the solution of geographical, urban, and regional planning problems, with emphasis on quantitative and statistical techniques used in spatial analysis and cartography, on the one hand, and program planning, on the other.

 

GEOG  482 - Integrated Geospatial Technologies

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus, Online: Spring

The course will cover resource mapping concepts and technologies.  Students are expected to have a background in GIS and remote sensing.  Topics will include survey methods (e.g. GPS), Internet Mapping Technologies (e.g. Google Earth), remoting sensing technologies such as LiDAR and digital imagery, classification methods, and data integration.  Students will be required to complete an independent mapping project.

 

GEOG  496 - Applied GIS

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus, Online: Fall, Spring, Summer

Applied GIST emphasizes applied problem solving approach within the context of a student-directed project. Specific GIS skills covered including project planning, spatial data sources and acquisition, data compilation, coding, analysis, representation, and presentation of results. The course can be repeated for credit, as each course will examine a different urban or environmental issue in the natural and social sciences using geographic information systems technology.

 

GEOG  573 - Spatial Analysis and Modeling

Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall

Explores the use of geographic information systems (GIS) as a tool for natural resource and environmental managers. Topics include spatial autocorrelation, interpolation techniques, and model integration. Examines sources of error and possible ramifications.  Graduate-level requirements include the students to show additional, sophisticated proficiency with the material through the completion of a final course project, consisting of an additional analysis of data provided by the students (see syllabus for point breakdown).

GIST  214 - Introduction to Map Science

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring, Summer. Online: Fall, Spring

This course is intended to provide a comprehensive introduction to the use of maps and map-like images for communication, analysis, and decision support.. Students will learn to acquire, read and interpret visual representations of the earth. These scientific principles are required for advancement and understanding of all geospatial technologies including geographic information systems, global positioning systems, and remote sensing.

 

GIST  314 - Cartographic Design and Production

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring, Summer. Online: Fall, Spring

Cartography is a fundamental tool of geography; it is also a science and art in its own right. Cartography uses principles of design, perception, statistics, and communication. This course introduces students to the design, production and interpretation of maps, a fundamental skill in GIST. Laboratory exercises give students additional experience with GIS-based skills, through the use of ArcGIS software.

 

GIST  315 - GIST Programming I

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring, Summer. Online: Fall, Spring

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of programming for Geographic Information Systems using Python. Students will be taught elements, methods and theories of scripting in Python including how to write and manipulate functions, loops, strings, lists, dictionaries, and classes with an emphasis on how to apply these tools to writing scripts in the ArcGIS environment. The only way to learn programming is by doing, and therefore this course is based on weekly coding assignments, supplemented by traditional readings and lecture materials that will build students' conceptual understanding of their burgeoning skills. Assessment will be based on weekly assignments, two midterm exams, and one in class presentation.

 

GIST  330 - Introduction to Remote Sensing

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall. Online: Fall, Spring, Summer

Introduction to remote sensing principles, techniques, and applications, designed principally for those with no background in the field.

 

GIST  414 - Web Mobile GIST

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring, Summer. Online: Fall, Spring

 

GIST 414 Web and Mobile Design is a required skills course for the BSGIST major. GIST 414 introduces students to the expanding field of web and mobile-based mapping applications development.  Students will apply skills gained in GIST I and Programming I and II to learn how to build interactive web and mobile apps that use geospatial data in an attractive format.

 

GIST  415 - Open Source Geographic Information Systems

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring, Summer. Online: Fall, Spring

This course provides students a brief introduction about Open Source software for both desktop and internet GIS applications. Main objective of the course is to expose students to alternative open source tools for practicing GIS besides licensed and conventional GIS software. Students will go through hands on learning about applications hosting, data development, processing, and sharing using open source tools and technologies such as GITHub , Quantum GIS (QGIS), Python, GeoServer and PostGIS. Students will apply technology in lab assignments using real-world data

 

GIST  416E - Geovisualization (GIS)

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring

Introduces principles and practices of Geovisualization (Geoviz) and softwares (Community and ERDAS Image).

 

GIST  417 - Geographic Information Systems for Natural and Social Sciences

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring, Summer. Online: Fall, Spring, Summer

Introduction to the application of GIS and related technologies for both the natural and social sciences. Conceptual issues in GIS database design and development, analysis, and display.

 

GIST  418 - Analysis of Geospatial Data

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus, Online: Fall

Introduction to spatial analysis and modeling techniques.  Students will learn how to use calculate spatial measurement, apply spatial statistical methods, create surfaces, and develop spatial modeling.  Assignments will allow students to apply the methods to various real world problems.

 

GIST  419/519 - Cartographic Modeling for Natural Resources

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Spring

Computer techniques for analyzing, modeling, and displaying geographic information. Development of spatially oriented problem design and the use of logic are applied to the use of GIS programs. Emphasis on applications in land resources management and planning.

 

GIST  420 - Advanced Geographic Information Systems

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus, Online: Spring

Examines various areas of advanced GIS applications such as dynamic segmentation, surface modeling, spatial statistics, and network modeling. The use of high performance workstations will be emphasized.

 

GIST  457 - Statistical Techniques in Geography, Regional Development and Planning

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall

Methods of gathering and analyzing data for the solution of geographical, urban, and regional planning problems, with emphasis on quantitative and statistical techniques used in spatial analysis and cartography, on the one hand, and program planning, on the other.

 

GIST  482 - Integrated Geospatial Technologies

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus, Online: Spring

The course will cover resource mapping concepts and technologies.  Students are expected to have a background in GIS and remote sensing.  Topics will include survey methods (e.g. GPS), Internet Mapping Technologies (e.g. Google Earth), remoting sensing technologies such as LiDAR and digital imagery, classification methods, and data integration.  Students will be required to complete an independent mapping project.

 

GIST  483 - Geographic Applications of Remote Sensing

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus, Online: Spring

Use of aircraft and satellite imagery for monitoring landforms, soils, vegetation and land use, with the focus on problems of land-use planning, resource management and related topics.

 

GIST  496 - Applied GIS

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring, Summer. Online: Fall, Spring

Applied GIST emphasizes applied problem solving approach within the context of a student-directed project. Specific GIS skills covered including project planning, spatial data sources and acquisition, data compilation, coding, analysis, representation, and presentation of results. The course can be repeated for credit, as each course will examine a different urban or environmental issue in the natural and social sciences using geographic information systems technology.

 

GIST  601 - Intro to Geographic Information Systems & Tech I

Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Spring. Online: Fall, Spring

This course will introduce the fundamental concepts of geographic information systems technology (GIST).  It will emphasize equally GISystems and GIScience.  Geographic information systems are a powerful set of tools for storing and retrieving at will, transforming and displaying spatial data from the real world for a particular set of purposes.  In contrast, geographic information science is concerned with both the research on GIS and with GIS.    As Longley et.al., notes (2001, vii) GIS is fundamentally an applications-led technology, yet science underpins successful applications.  This course will combine an overview of the general principles of GIScience and how this relates to the nature and analytical use of spatial information within GIS software and technology.  Students will apply the principles and science of GIST through a series of practical labs using ESRIs ArcGIS software.

 

GIST  601A - Geographic Information Science

Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring. Online: Fall, Spring

This course will introduce the fundamental concepts of geographic information systems technology (GIST).  It will emphasize equally GISystems and GIScience.  Geographic information systems are a powerful set of tools for storing, retrieving, transforming and displaying spatial data from the real world for a particular set of purposes.  In contrast, geographic information science is concerned with both the research on GIS and with GIS. As Longley et.al., notes (2001, vii) "GIS is fundamentally an applications-led technology, yet science underpins successful applications."  This course will combine an overview of the general principles of GIScience and how this relates to the nature and analytical use of spatial information within GIS software and technology.  Students will apply the principles and science of GIST through a series of practical labs using ESRI's ArcGIS software.

 

GIST  603A - Geographic Information Systems Programming and Automation

Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring, Summer. Online: Fall, Spring, Summer

The goal of this course is to gain an introductory understanding of geographic programming and data automation techniques using ModelBuilder and the Python language.

 

GIST  603B - WebGIS

Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring. Online: Fall, Spring

The goal of this course is to gain an understanding of web mapping using applications like ArcGIS for Server, ArcGIS Online (AGOL), WebAppBuilder (WAB), web-enabled geoprocessing, Story Maps, AppStudio, and the Javascript API

 

GIST  604 - Advanced Geographic Information Systems & Tech II

Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall. Online: Fall, Summer

This course focuses on the integration of remote sensing with GIS and advance spatial analysis techniques.  Principles of remote sensing examined include digital and multispectral image processing and enhancement, georectification, spectral characteristics, and land-use and land-cover boundary detection.  As remote sensing deals with raster based data, there will also be an emphasis on integration of remotely sensed imagery and analysis with vector based data within ArcGIS.  This leads to integrative (raster/vector) based issues such as projection, scale, map overlay functionality, as well as analysis techniques that require the transformation of data (vector to raster, or raster to vector) to perform advanced spatial analysis.  The advanced spatial analysis portion of the course examines Z-score evaluation, point pattern analysis, kernel density analysis, spatial interpolation methodology, map algebra, and error and uncertainty estimations.

 

GIST  604A - Applied Geographic Information Systems

Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring. Online: Fall, Spring.

This course focuses on an applied project GIS project that simulates a "real world" application of GIS towards a practical problem.

On the first few nights in the course a specific geographic problem will be presented, data needed to address the problem will be reviewed, and key deadlines for the course will be set.  No late assignments will be accepted unless circumstances are related to the course attendance policy.  As this course simulates a business environment, deadlines must be met which will be used to evaluate your course grade and your progress toward completing the project on time.  The first deadline requires two items to be evaluated: (1) a GIS database you will construct to address the geographic problem; (2) a review of your maps that will form the basis of your final presentation.

 

GIST  604B - Open Source GIS

Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring. Online: Fall, Spring.

The focus of this class is to examine and apply GIS open source programming.  We will examine common languages used like Python, Java, html 5, as well as APIs, JSON, html, and SQL, to automate workflows, extend the tools, and create interactive web and mobile GS platforms. Topics include preparing data as strings, lists, tuples, and dictionaries prior to use, using Python to run SQL queries, working with roasters in Python, automating mapping tasks, and developing custom scripting tools.  In addition to weekly assignments and readings, assessment will be oriented around a single, student-directed project that will take the second half of the semester to complete.  It will require students to write a simple script to accomplish a specified task in ArcGIS and present the results of their work to peers.

 

GIST  909 - Master's Project in Geographic Info Systems Tech

Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Online: Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

The Master's Project includes a formal report and presentation submitted in lieu of a Master's Thesis and reflects what a student has learned from the MS in GIST program. This course requires a student to formulate, design, implement and present results related to a specific normative and/or scientific geographic problem.  This course will involve data capture, compilation and manipulation, and formulating methods and analysis to address a geographic problem in a given timeline.  The geographic problem under investigation will require research to be completed out side of class in the form of field work, ground truthing, or background research in the library or through other sources.  Your Master's Project can focus on subjects related to personal interests, work done through an employer or an internship, or work that is supervised by a faculty or staff members on campus.

HPS  401 - Introduction to Mapping for Public Health

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus/ Online: Spring

This course will provide an introduction to public health mapping. Course content includes fundamental mapping concepts, current applications of mapping within the public health field, and exercises to gain practical experience using web-based GIS technology to communicate public health messages. This is a writing emphasis course.

HIST  483 - Mapping the Past:  The History of Cartography

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall

This interdisciplinary one-semester, 3-unit, readings and discussions seminar is designed for upper division undergraduate students with interests in history, geography and cartography. It offers broadly-based coverage of major topics in the history of cartography, including the theoretical turn in the "new cartography," the cultural history of cartography, and the role of GIS. Using case studies from the Anglo-European world, we will examine the role of maps in exploration, colonization, and imperialism; cartographic representation of the New World from European and indigenous perspectives; Humboldtian traditions in the Americas; nation-state border projects; and various genres of mapping. Throughout we will examine maps as evidence, develop skills in spatial analysis and interpretation, and consider how maps can be used by historians and other scholars.

LAR  470/570 - Intro to GIS for Planning and Landscape Architecture

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring

This course is an introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for graduate students in planning and landscape architecture and undergraduate students interested in design and the built environment. We will focus on three core usage domains of GIS: data management, communication/visualization, and analysis. Specifically, this class focuses on how fluency in these domains contributes to better design and planning of the built environment.

MNE  444/544 - Geopositioning for Mining Applications

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall

Geopositioning techniques as applied in the mining industry. Topics cover Global Positioning System (GPS), Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing, Modern Mapping and Scanning Instruments, Geographical Information System (GIS). The materials covered support concepts and topics discussed in other mining courses by allowing the students to collect, process and analyze digital data and use the information to design ventilation system, rock blasting, underground support system, mining sequences, monitor subsidence and slope movements, and simplify the reclamation process. The course is comprised of a lecture period where concepts related to each of the topics listed above will be discussed, and a hands-on portion, which provides the students the opportunity to operate a GPS, motorized total station, and LIDAR scanner in order to acquire data and analyze the collected information using advanced processing software.

PLG  457/557 - Statistical Techniques in Geography, Regional Development and Planning

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall

Methods of gathering and analyzing data for the solution of geographical, urban, and regional planning problems, with emphasis on quantitative and statistical techniques used in spatial analysis and cartography, on the one hand, and program planning, on the other.

 

PLG  516C - Urban Geographic Information Systems

Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Spring

Introduces concepts and application skills for use of geographic information systems to investigate a range of urban spatial issues and decision-making processes.  Emphasis on complete process of GIS-based problem solving, including project planning, spatial data sources/acquisition, preparation/coding, analysis, representation, and communication.  Graduate-level requirements include writing an original research papers based on original data collected in the field.

RNR 416A/516A - Computer Cartography

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Spring

Introduces the principles of map design, production and analysis.

 

RNR  416C/516C - Urban Geographic Information Systems

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Spring

Introduces concepts and application skills for use of geographic information systems to investigate a range of urban spatial issues and decision-making processes.  Emphasis on complete process of GIS-based problem solving, including project planning, spatial data sources/acquisition, preparation/coding, analysis, representation, and communication.

 

RNR 416D/516D - PPGIS: Participatory Approaches in Geographic Information Science

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Contact Department

A project-based course focusing on applications and impacts of GIS and other spatial analysis technologies in grassroots community development, participatory decision making, and community-engaged social science.  Class format includes discussion seminar, GIS workshop, collaboration, and out-of-classroom community involvement.

 

RNR 416E/516E - Geovisualization (GIS)

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall, Spring

Introduces principles and practices of Geovisualization (Geoviz) and softwares (Community and ERDAS Image).

 

RNR 416F/516F - GIS for the Social Sciences

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Fall

An advanced course for students who want to integrate social science data and geographic information science into their research or work life.  The course is presented in a lecture/laboratory format.  The lecture portion will deal with conceptual issues necessary for the integration of social science data and approaches within a GIS framework.  The laboratory portion will provide practical experience with GIS software products used for the development and analysis of spatially-referenced social science data sets.

 

RNR  417/517 - Geographic Information Systems for Natural and Social Sciences

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus, Online: Fall, Spring, Summer

Introduction to the application of GIS and related technologies for both the natural and social sciences. Conceptual issues in GIS database design and development, analysis, and display.

 

RNR 418/518 - Analysis of Geospatial Data

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus, Online: Fall

Introduction to spatial analysis and modeling techniques.  Students will learn how to use calculate spatial measurement, apply spatial statistical methods, create surfaces, and develop spatial modeling.  Assignments will allow students to apply the methods to various real world problems.

 

RNR 419/519 - Cartographic Modeling for Natural Resources

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus: Spring

Computer techniques for analyzing, modeling, and displaying geographic information. Development of spatially oriented problem design and the use of logic are applied to the use of GIS programs. Emphasis on applications in land resources management and planning.

 

RNR  420/520 - Advanced Geographic Information Systems

Undergraduate, 3.00 Units/ Graduate, 3.00 Units

Main campus, Online: Spring

Examines various areas of advanced GIS applications such as dynamic segmentation, surface modeling, spatial statistics, and network modeling. The use of high performance workstations will be emphasized.